What to Expect

BIBLE SATURATED CORPORATE WORSHIP

When we gather together we read the Bible, preach the Bible, pray the Bible, sing the Bible, and see the Bible (in baptism and the Lord’s Supper). God accomplishes His purposes for His people through His Word (Gen. 1:3; Isa. 55:10-11; Acts 12:24), so we strive to saturate ourselves with His Word in everything we say and do.

A CULTURE OF DISCIPLING

The following quote comes from a book by pastor Mark Dever on Discipling. Though we do not model this perfectly, our prayer is that God will more and more transform us into a culture of discipling like the one Pastor Mark describes here.

“Ultimately, our corporate responsibilities and our individual responsibilities blend together in a culture of discipling. We read and speak the Word to each other. We spend time with each other. We pray for the elders and one another. We love. We give. We attend the weekly gathering prayerfully and with anticipation. We come prepared. We plow up our hearts beforehand, ready to receive God’s Word. We follow the example of our leaders who show us how to follow Christ ourselves. We submit to the wise leadership of the elders unless they are leading us in the wrong direction. We respect the stewardship the congregation has of us. We counsel and encourage and warn one another. “Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion that it may give grace to those who hear” (Eph. 4:29).

In the life of a church, spiritual growth and health should be the norm. It should be normal to see people growing and maturing spiritually. In fact, spiritual growth is not optional for the Christian; it indicates life. Things that are truly alive grow. Dead things don’t. God has gifted a church with elders for the purposes of growth, and he has given us one another. It’s within the context of all these relationships with members and pastors alike, all covenanted together, that we find the richest soil (along with the Christian family) for discipling relationships to (super)naturally grow. Our doctrine and life attain their shape within the doctrine and life of the community. This is a culture of discipling” (Mark Dever, Discipling, 66-67).